Caucasian Ovcharka Guardian Dogs (also known as: Caucasian Ovtcharka, Caucasian Sheepdog,   Caucasian Shepherd's Dog,  Kavkaskaya Ovcharka,  Caucasian Owtcharka  (NOT mountain dog!)

For more information or to reserve a puppy, call
406-485-2020

courageouscaucasians@hotmail.com

To see more photos click on:  www.caucasianovcharkadogs.com
         
 



 

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BREED CHARACTERISTICS
of the CAUCASIAN OVCHARKA

PARENTS & PUPPIES

HOW TO STEAL THE HEART OF A PUPPY

SHOULD I OWN A CAUCASIAN OVCHARKA?

PUPPIES FOR SALE

CANINE HEALTH:
 *nutrition
 
*vaccinations
 
*early neutering
 
*exercise

TRAINING TIPS

DEAR SVETLANA

A TYPICAL DAY AT
PLAY

COOLING OFF IN
MONTANA

PUPPIES 2002

GALLERY:
 *Caucasian Pictorial
 *Winter Scenes

  *Action

FAVORITE DOG
BOOKS

FAVORITE LINKS

GUESTBOOK

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Last updated:
December 24, 2008

Interesting Quotes:

"In the last 4-5 years, parvovirus in the US has been the biggest problem for kennels, even in vaccinated dogs."
(Foster-Smith Pet
Catalog, Vol. 03-57)

***

"She was a seven-month-old, gorgeous, taupe-colored devil in dogs clothing. But I loved her."
(Paul Loeb)

***

"The diet of our companion animals is deplorable. So many dogs and cats eat out of bags full of poor ingredients, rancid fats and powerful preservatives."
(Don Hamilton, DVM
from Homeopathic Care for Cats and Dogs)

***

Command; he thee obeys most readily.
Strike him; he whines and falls down at thy feet.
Call him; he leaves his game and comes to thee
With wagging tail,
offering his service meek.

If so thou wilt, a collar he will wear;
And when thou wish to take it off again,
Unto thy feet he crouchest down most fair,
As if thy will were all his good and gain.
(J. Molle)

***

"The more confidence you have in your dog, the more he will believe in you."
(From: Smarter Than You Think, by Paul Loeb)

***

"The housebound dog leads a stressed existence. It cannot express its natural behaviors: stalking, chasing, exploring, investigating."
(From: The Dog's Mind, by Bruce Fogle)

 

 

 

PARENTS & PUPPIES


House guests: "Pavlov" and "Guard" seven weeks old
(Summer, 2001)

As I have mentioned before in this Web site, our puppies are born and raised in the utility room just off the kitchen until they are four weeks old (that is as long as the puppies' mom cleans up all their little messes).

When Czara's first litter of puppies was first born (Summer, 2000), she wouldn't leave them for a whole 24 hours.  Finally, I put a leash on Czara and literally pulled her out the door so she could pee and walk around a bit.  Then she was back to her puppies in a flash.  One of her puppies, "Dozor," was given his name because, while the other pups would take what they could get and wait their turn to nurse, Dozor was just alike a little bulldozer, plowing his way over and under the pile of brothers and sisters to "his" rear teat.  I looked for a Russian word that meant "bulldozer" but couldn't find one. Instead, while looking through the book, Russian Names for Russian Dogs, by I. Zerebko, I found the Russian word "dozor" (pronounced do-zohr) which means "patrol" or "watchman" - a good name for a Caucasian Ovtcharka puppy, don't you think?  (He was a neat puppy, a real mama's boy - but still a Courageous Caucasian.)

I am fascinated by puppies and the changes they "grow" through and was always handling and cuddling Czara's puppies.  I guess you could say that I was a "co-mom" with Czara.  I would play with a puppy and then bring it to Czara who would often go into the dining room where it was cooler to avoid the summer heat.  This way she could nurse four or five at a time instead of all of them at once.  One night Czara was whining to come out of the puppy room.  I let her out.  Then she cried to get back in.  I let her back in.  Then she would cry to come out again and then whine to get back in.  She was getting frustrated trying to communicate with her "dumb owner" as to what she wanted.  "Czara!" I screamed, "What is it?"  Suddenly it dawned on me:  Ohhhhh, she wants me to bring four or five puppies to her in the dining room!  "Well, sorry, Czara, at two in the morning, I don't think so!"  And I shut her in the puppy room for the night.


"Czara" and puppies, 2001

A couple weeks later, I decided that since it was 65 to 70 degrees at night, the little family would be more comfortable staying out and sleeping under the back deck.  (I mean, after all, in days gone by in their homeland of the Caucasus Mountains, the nights were quite a bit cooler!)  My lilac bushes were well-pruned.


Parents "Rudi" & "Czara"

Czara and I were both excellent moms for her puppies.  We both cuddled and played with them, and neither of us ever stepped or laid on a puppy.  If a puppy squealed, both of us would come running.  Near weaning time, Czara brought home a couple of pheasants (much enjoyed by the pups) and a couple or three dead raccoons (which I promptly threw away!).  She was gentle, patient and firm, and the little guys were always well-behaved with her, and NEVER talked back to her.  Human parents should take a lesson from their bitches from time to time.  The father of the puppies was not allowed visitation rights by Czara until they were two to three months old.  But the puppies got to "bother" Scoobie and Blue, our stock dogs, ALL THE TIME.

Our puppies get to see all the livestock, the cows, horses, chickens, visit with the sheep and play with the kittens.


"Soyuznik" & friends

They take turns going for car rides and take a couple five or ten minute sessions to learn how to walk on a leash.  Later, the pups that aren't sold right away even start some obedience lessons.  How fast they learn!

I must say, however, that one thing a Caucasian Ovtcharka does not automatically do is .... come when called.  Believe it or not, he will learn this through training, just do not expect him to be like a stock dog in this respect.

Let me now introduce you to the "stars" of this Web site:

Czara:  What can I say except Czara is a dog that does nothing wrong.  She does not mess in the house; she does not chew on anything but her own toys; she does not steal food off the table.  She does not bark unless there is a reason.  She ignores visitors when we are there, but is a fierce guard when we are not home.  She can either stay in and take care of the house for hours when we are gone or come along, completely well-behaved with us in the truck where she will bark and growl if someone were to come too close to the window.  She is our indispensable ranch foreman, ignoring the livestock and keeping all predators away.  She is our sweet and completely submissive (to us) "Babochka."  How could we run the ranch without Czara?


"Czara," a Caucasian in her element

Svetlana was not the prettiest one, but somehow she was the puppy I always, for some reason, played with the most.  She'd fall asleep on my lap the most, sleep with me on the couch the most (shhhh, don't tell anybody).  She was always first in line.  Who was the first puppy to venture out?  Svetlana.  Who was the first puppy at age 2 1/2 weeks to growl?  Svetlana.  The first to bark?  The first to chase a kitty?  The first to find a bone or stick to chew on?  Svetlana, Svetlana, Svetlana.  She is the "birthday girl" at the party.  "I get all the presents.  I get all the kisses."  One morning she is sitting there as all the other puppies are sleeping, and she gives a little howl as if to say, "Hey, hear what I can do?"  She taught all the ranch dogs to sing with the train.  Now whenever the freight train goes by, they all sing with it.  Sometimes I sing along too.  Jim says Svetlana is just like her mom when she was that age.  Since the first day I met her, the day she was born, Svetlana is my puppy.


Puppy "Svetlana" says, 'I see a kitty over there.'

Soyuznik:  Early on I fell in love with the little Russian puppy face of Soyuznik.  And although we were only going to keep a female from the litter, I knew I had to have Soyuznik for myself.  He is sensitive like his brothers and sisters, but oh so confident and courageous, quite aloof with strangers, very mature and dignified.  He has that knowing look in his eye.  He is my pal.


The Russian puppy face of "Soyuznik," six weeks old

Rudi:  He is big-boned, bear-faced.  His coat is thick and beautiful - rust-colored with steel-grey undercoat.

Rudi is a real player, bouncing-sweet - not at all mature for his age, not at all dignified.  That is until the neighbor dog comes too close to our fence line.  Suddenly the demeanor changes, and I have two dogs rolled up into one.  My husband's impossibly playful, slobbering fool of a pup is instantly transformed into this eight-month-old, 101 pound all-business COURAGEOUS CAUCASIAN OVTCHARKA !!!

Rudi runs full speed to chase that canine neighbor off and stops dead like at a brick wall at the boundary.  You see, our house and 50-acres "yard" are situated close to our north border, and is actually within the city limits of the little town of Ismay, Montana (population: 25).  So we do have close neighbors, and neighbor dogs that are quite interested when Czara is in heat and confined.  That interest, however, is quickly squelched by Rudi (and Soyuznik).

Blue, our Australian Cattle Dog, tries to act like a tough guy.  I shake my head and sigh.  Don't give up your day job, Blue.  Better stick to driving cows. 

And leave the guard duties to our Courageous Caucasians!


"Rudi" on guard at 8 months old

 

HOME  ****   BREED CHARACTERISTICS  ***  PARENTS & PUPPIES  *** HOW TO STEAL THE HEART OF A PUPPY  *** SHOULD I ?  ***  NUTRITION  ***  VACCINATIONS  ***  EXERCISE  ***  EARLY NEUTERING  ***  TRAINING TIPS  ***  DEAR SVETLANA  ***  A TYPICAL DAY AT PLAY  ***  COOLING OFF IN MONTANA  ***  PUPPIES 2002  *** GALLERY: **  Winter Scenes **  Caucasian Pictorial  **  Action   ***  FAVORITE DOG BOOKS  *** FAVORITE LINKS  ***  GUESTBOOK  ***  

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